Neuroteachers

neurodivergent

inclusion rather than punishment and reward

A controversial blog about behaviour part 3 – Punishments and Rewards don’t work, so don’t use them.

Punishments and Rewards don’t work, so don’t use them. This is the 3rd part of my series of blogs on behaviour. I have promised to talk more about how I became a relational practitioner. And I will get to that, but first let’s deal with punishments and rewards, and why they do not work to […]

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recovering behaviourist

A controversial blog about behaviour – Part 2

Confessions of a recovering behaviourist Catrina Lowri is a neurodivergent teacher, trainer, and coach. As well as having 22 years’ experience of working in education, she also speaks as a dyslexic and bipolar woman, who had her own unique journey through the education system This is the second blog in the series called ‘ A controversial blog about

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A controversial blog about behaviour – Part 1

Catrina Lowri is a neurodivergent teacher, trainer, and coach. As well as having 22 years’ experience of working in education, she also speaks as a dyslexic and bipolar woman, who had her own unique journey through the education system.   I’m writing this by popular request. I’ve been reluctant. The topic is highly controversial, with many strong and

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top 10 tips on how to manage conflict

10 Top Tips for Parents and Educators: managing conflict

Disagreement is a natural part of human interaction. This is particularly the case when dealing with sensitive issues such as the care and education of a child. In this guide we will look 10 top tips which can help prevent conflicts arising or mitigate their effect when they arise. What is open discussion? Be transparent

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Fostering inclusion

“Fostering Inclusion: How School Leaders Are Transforming Work Environments for Teachers with Special Needs and Disabilities”

Introduction: In today’s educational landscape, fostering inclusivity for staff with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) is a crucial aspect of creating a supportive work environment for educators. As with pupils, there are 4 main categories of SEND in adults; physical, medical, and sensory needs, cognition and learning needs, communication and interaction needs and social,

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school refusal

School refusal – Who is refusing? And how can we help?

School Refusal You can probably tell from the title, that I don’t like the term ‘school refusal’. Firstly, it isn’t accurate. The child or young person is not refusing to go to school. They can’t or won’t go because they have experienced school-based trauma. When I’m talking about this topic, I refer to the learner

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school-and-parent-relationships

A SERVE AND RETURN : SCHOOL & FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS

SCHOOL AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS ‘Research from Ofsted finds poor relationships with parents can add significantly to low morale and poor wellbeing in teaching’ (Independent Education today, 2019).  On reading this article by Julian Owen on the importance of school and parent relationships, I was compelled to put pen to paper – not only to reiterate

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